Freeplay Independent Games Festival

The Twine Revolution

Now that it’s as easy to make a game as take a photo, new voices are coming out to play. This session will explore what happens when power is in the hands of the community, and what that community is choosing to make.

With Kircy Jong, Paul Callaghan, and Mary Hamilton

Game Masters

Games and Cultural Spaces

Presentation – slides, podcast

Explore the challenges of creating a cultural framework for exhibiting and programming videogames, and the role of institutions and festivals in showcasing and defining the cannon of the gaming industry. Panel includes Conrad Bodman (ACMI), Paul Callaghan (Freeplay), Linda Pitt (State Library of QLD) and Ricardo Peach (Australia Council’s Inter-Arts). Chaired by freelance games writer, Leena van Deventer.

In Conversation with Warren Spector

Video

Join Warren Spector, master of role playing game design, as he explores the ideas that have changed the gaming industry.

Spector is known for creating influential titles such as System Shock, Deus Ex, Ultima Underworld and Thief: The Dark Project. His most recent release, Epic Mickey, has been hailed as the embodiment of his renowned philosophy on videogame design.

Don’t miss this rare opportunity to hear from an industry legend, who has irrefutably influenced videogame theory and design.

Flexing the Story Muscle

Podcast

Tim Schafer (Founder and Director of Double Fine Productions) will explore the importance of story in games, providing insights into his creative process and leadership. Facilitated by Paul Callaghan (Freeplay).

Industry Session – Where to from here?

Discussing the themes of the 2 day forum.

Adelaide Writers’ Week

Books, Movies, TV, Games

We live in a world where our stories are increasingly found, not only in books, but on screens. Doctor Who and playwright Robert Shearman (UK) and games designer Paul Callaghan (UK/AUS) discuss narrative across platforms including books, movies, and games – some of the many places we see story in action

On and Off the Page

Increasingly our most compelling stories are being told on film, on television and in video games. Genre fiction rules in the bookshops, the cinemas, and, with L.A.Noire, in gameland. This session brings together novelist Megan Abbott (Die a Little), games designer Paul Callaghan and Robert Shearman (Doctor Who) to discuss the differences between writing for the page and the screen.

Game Connect Asia Pacific

Turning Off Our Screens

Presentation – transcript & slides

With so much of our development and playtime devoted to screens and technology, it’s easy to think that videogames are a screen medium with the same, or at least similar enough, strengths, weaknesses, and opportunities for storytelling, or that they’re a technology industry trying to build better, faster, smarter, widgets or tools for creating widgets. Anyone working in games has, at some point, suspected if not outright known that this isn’t the case. This talk looks at other lenses through which to view games, and along the way wonders aloud what it might look like if we broke away from the reliance on screen culture and the surrounding dialogue – and also what we might need to start telling ourselves and others as part of that shift.

The Assessment Panel

Panel – video

Submissions to any funding agency go through a process of assessment and evaluation that involves those administering the funds and outside experts who bring a range of experiences and lenses through which to view the applications. This panel brings together assessors who have worked for state and federal agencies, including Film Victoria, Screen Australia, and Industry and Investment NSW to share what they look for in an application, what works and doesn’t work, and how to make your submission stand out.

Government Round Table

Presentation – Transcript & slides

A look at the need for support of a diverse maker community that exists in games – just as it exists in other creative industries.

Continuum Pop Culture Convention

Panel – Computer Games & Storytelling

Which games do it well, which games do it badly and how much is it necessary (or even desireable) in a computer game anyway? Paul Callaghan, Ben McKenzie, Sam Mellor, Kirsty Sculler

National Screenwriters’ Conference

Are you Game? : Writing for Games

Are you an x-box? Or more of an Atari? Do you even know the difference? If you do, then this session’s for you. If you don’t, its time to update your knowledge and explore opportunities for writers’ and trends with games as the genre continues to grow quicker than any other form of entertainment. Speakers will present invaluable ‘how to’ tips as well as case studies on films and TV shows that have benefited from games and vice-versa.

Game Connect Asia Pacific

Government Round Table

Presentation – blog post

According to iGEA research, 68% of Australian’s play video games, but despite this number, there is still a disconnect in how they are viewed as part of the broader culture – a disconnect that in turn affects how they are viewed by governments both economically and culturally.

This presentation outlines the cultural place of video games, and attempts to reframe the thinking around their future support.

Chair: The Take Home

After two days of talks, panels, workshops, and networking it can be hard to see the forest for the trees. This final session brings together some of the key speakers from GCAP and examines the threads and trends that have dominated the discussion before taking a look towards the future of our industry, our business, and our craft.

Emerging Writers’ Festival

Never Surrender

Writing isn’t all about success stories! Join our writers as they speak candidly about rejection, creative risk-taking and projects that took ten years from creation to publication. Why do they stick with it, and is it all worth it in the end?

With — Paul Callaghan, Elizabeth Campbell, Sean Condon and Dee White. Hosted by Stu Hatton.

Format Academy of Words

Mining the personal

They say write what you know, but how easy is it to write about yourself or draw material from your life? Do you feel exposed when people read your words, and how do you deal with the fallout? And what happens when people mistake your characters for you?

Non-paper publishing

Books are great, but what are other avenues for writers to be heard and distributed? What are the challenges of writing for digital, audio and live audiences? Is it all about the words or is it all in the delivery?